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Academic Catalog

    Argosy University
   
 
  Sep 23, 2017
 
 
    
2017-2018 Argosy University Academic Catalog—Graduate Programs | Volume 8, Issue 1

Doctor of Psychology in School Psychology Degree Program (32 Credit Hours)


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Offering Campuses


Argosy University, Phoenix; Argosy University, Sarasota

Program Overview


The Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) in School Psychology degree program is designed to respond to the National Association of School Psychology (NASP) recommendation to provide opportunities for doctoral study to EdS in School Psychology or a practicing school psychologist.

Program Learning Outcomes

2.1 Data-Based Decision Making and Accountability – Knowledge

2.1.1 School psychologists have knowledge of varied methods of assessment and data collection methods for identifying strengths and needs, developing effective services and programs, and measuring progress and outcomes.

2.1 Data-Based Decision Making and Accountability – Skills

2.1A.Candidates use psychological and educational assessment, data collection strategies, and technology resources as part of a comprehensive process of effective decision making and problem solving that permeates all aspects of service delivery.

2.1B.Candidates use assessment and data collection methods to evaluate response to, progress in, and outcomes for services in order to promote improvement and effectiveness.

2.2 Consultation and Collaboration – Knowledge

2.2.1 School psychologists have knowledge of varied methods of consultation, collaboration, and communication applicable to individuals, families, groups, and systems and used to promote effective implementation of services.

2.2 Consultation and Collaboration – Skills

2.2A.Candidates apply consultation methods, collaborate, and communicate effectively with others as part of a comprehensive process that permeates all aspects of service delivery.

2.3 Interventions and Instructional Support to Develop Academic Skills - Knowledge

2.3.1 School psychologists have knowledge of biological, cultural, and social influences on academic skills; human learning, cognitive, and developmental processes; and evidence based curriculum and instructional strategies.

2.3 Interventions and Instructional Support to Develop Academic Skills - Skills

2.3A. Candidates use assessment and data collection methods to develop and implement appropriate academic goals for children with diverse abilities, disabilities, backgrounds, strengths, and needs.

2.4 Interventions and Mental Health Services to Develop Social and Life Skills – Knowledge

2.4.1 School psychologists have knowledge of biological, cultural, developmental, and social influences on behavior and mental health; behavioral and emotional impacts on learning and life skills; and evidence-based strategies to promote social–emotional functioning and mental health.

2.4 Interventions and Mental Health Services to Develop Social and Life Skills – Skills

2.4A. Candidates use assessment and data collection methods to develop appropriate social–emotional, behavioral, and mental health goals for children with diverse abilities, disabilities, backgrounds, strengths, and needs.

2.5 School-Wide Practices to Promote Learning – Knowledge

2.5.1 School psychologists have knowledge of school and systems structure, organization, and theory; general and special education; technology resources; and evidence-based school practices that promote academic outcomes, learning, social development, and mental health.

2.5 School-Wide Practices to Promote Learning – Skills

2.5A. Candidates design and implement evidence-based practices and policies in, for example, areas such as discipline, instructional support, staff training, school improvement activities, program evaluation, student transitions at all levels of schooling, grading, home–school partnerships, etc.

2.6 Preventive and Responsive Services – Knowledge

2.6.1 School psychologists have knowledge of principles and research related to resilience and risk factors in learning and mental health, services in schools and communities to support multi-tiered prevention, and evidence-based strategies for effective crisis response.

2.6 Preventive and Responsive Services – Skills

2.6A. Candidates promote environments, contexts, and services for children that enhance learning, mental and physical well-being, and resilience through protective and adaptive factors and that prevent academic problems, bullying, violence, and other risks.

2.6B. Candidates contribute to, design, implement, and/or evaluate services for crisis prevention, preparation, response, and recovery at the individual, family, and systems levels and that take into account diverse needs and characteristics.

2.7 Family–School Collaboration Services - Knowledge

2.7.1 School psychologists have knowledge of principles and research related to family systems, strengths, needs, and culture; evidence-based strategies to support family influences on children’s learning, socialization, and mental health; and methods to develop collaboration between families and schools.

2.7 Family–School Collaboration Services - Skills

2.7A. Candidates design and implement evidence-based practices and policies that facilitate family–school partnerships and interactions with community agencies to enhance academic, learning, social, and mental health outcomes for all children.

2.8 Diversity in Development and Learning – Knowledge

2.8.1 School psychologists have knowledge of individual differences, abilities, disabilities, and other diverse characteristics; principles and research related to diversity factors for children, families, and schools, including factors related to culture, context, and individual and role differences; and evidence-based strategies to enhance services and address potential influences related to diversity.

2.8 Diversity in Development and Learning – Skills

2.8A. Candidates provide effective professional services in data-based decision making, consultation and collaboration, and direct and indirect services for individuals, families, and schools with diverse characteristics, cultures, and backgrounds and across multiple contexts, with recognition that an understanding of and respect for diversity and in development and learning is a foundation for all aspects of service delivery.

2.8B. Candidates provide culturally competent and effective practices in all areas of school psychology service delivery and in the contexts of diverse individual, family, school, and community characteristics.

2.9 Research and Program Evaluation – Knowledge

2.9.1 School psychologists have knowledge of research design, statistics, measurement, varied data collection and analysis techniques, and program evaluation methods sufficient for understanding research and interpreting data in applied settings.

2.9 Research and Program Evaluation – Skills

2.9A. Candidates evaluate and synthesize a cumulative body of research and its findings as a foundation for effective service delivery.

2.9B. Candidates provide assistance in schools and other settings for analyzing, interpreting, designing, and applying empirical evidence as a foundation for effective practices at the individual, group, and/or systems levels.

2.10 Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice – Knowledge

2.10.1 School psychologists have knowledge of the history and foundations of school psychology; multiple service models and methods; ethical, legal, and professional standards; and other factors related to professional identity and effective practice as school psychologists.

2.10 Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice – Skills

2.10A. Candidates provide services consistent with ethical and professional standards in school psychology.

2.10B. Candidates provide services consistent with legal standards and regulations relevant for practice in settings in which school psychologists work.

2.10C. Candidates advocate for school psychologists’ professional roles to provide effective services, ensure access to their services, and enhance the learning and mental health of all children and youth.

Admission Requirements


  • An Education Specialist (EdS) degree or its equivalent (Master’s + 30 credit hours) in the area of school psychology from a regionally accredited institution or an appropriately certified foreign institution
  • A grade point average of at least 3.0 (on a scale of 4.0) for the last 60 hours of coursework (including all graduate work)
  • A minimum score on an Argosy University pre-approved English language proficiency test is required for all applicants whose native language is not English or who have not graduated from an institution at which English is the language of instruction as specified in Section Five, Admission Policies, “English Language Proficiency Policy .”
  • Evidence of certification or state licensure as a practicing school psychologist
  • Completion of an interview with a member of the program Admissions Committee
  • Evidence of Criminal Background Check*

All applications for admission will be submitted to the Admissions Department and will include at least the following:

  • Completed Application for Admission Form
  • Personal statement with a self-appraisal of qualifications for the profession
  • Current résumé (or current summary)
  • Three completed Applicant Recommendation Forms
  • Official transcripts from all postsecondary schools attended
Note

*Students at Argosy University, Phoenix are required to present a photocopy of valid Identity Verified Prints (IVP) Fingerprint Clearance Card (plastic) issued by the Arizona Department of Public Safety.

Graduation Requirements


To be eligible for awarding of the PsyD in School Psychology, students must meet the following requirements:

  • Satisfactory completion of 32 credit hours that includes: 
    • 9  credit hours of core courses
    • 12 credit hours of concentration courses
    • 5 credit hours of dissertation
    • 6 credit hours of internship
  • A minimum grade point average of at least 3.0 (on a scale of 4.0), and a grade of “B-” or better in all required courses
  • Successful defense of the School Psychology Dissertation
  • Completion of all degree requirements within seven years of matriculation
  • Completed Petition to Graduate form submitted to campus administration 

Program Requirements


Students in the PsyD in School Psychology degree program for certified and practicing school psychologists are required to complete 32 credit hours distributed as follows: core course requirements, 9 credit hours; concentration requirements, 12 credit hours; dissertation requirements; 5 credit hours; internship requirements; 6 credit hours.

Core Course Requirements


Students in the PsyD in School Psychology degree program for licensed/certified practicing School Psychologists take 3 core courses (9 credit hours).

Concentration Requirements


Students in the PsyD in School Psychology degree program for licensed/certified practicing school psychologists are required to complete one of the following concentrations.

Advanced Assessment Concentration


The Advanced Assessment concentration is designed to prepare students to:

  • Administer, interpret, and conceptualize data from tests that assess students with low incidence disabilities including autism spectrum disorders, multiple disabilities, orthopedic impairments, other health impairments, and traumatic brain injuries.
  • Work with professionals from other disciplines to generate and evaluate behavioral and academic interventions that address the individual needs of all students.

Advanced Assessment Concentration Requirements—12 Credit Hours


Intervention and Counseling Concentration


The Intervention and Counseling Concentration is designed to prepare students to:

  • Utilize advanced counseling techniques to facilitate the personal, educational, social, and emotional development of the children and families they serve.
  • Develop counseling programs to serve the mental health needs of children and adolescents within the school system and its community.

Intervention and Counseling Concentration Requirements—Students Are Required to Take the Following


Intervention and Counseling Concentration Requirements—12 Credit Hours


Cultural Linguistic Diversity Concentration


The Cultural Linguistic Diversity Concentration is designed to prepare students to:

  • Apply expertise and advanced knowledge to develop culturally relevant and competent assessments and therapeutic intervention programs and strategies.
  • Critically examine the influence of culture in diagnosis and child development and intra- psychic and interpersonal factors.
  • Develop ethnically competent prevention programs that incorporate culture-specific conditions.

 

Cultural Linguistic Diversity Concentration Requirements—12 Credit Hours


Dissertation Requirements


Students in the PsyD in School Psychology degree program for licensed/certified practicing psychologists complete 5 credit hours of dissertation courses.

Dissertation Requirements—5 Credit Hours


Internship Requirements


Students in the PsyD in School Psychology degree program complete 6 credit hours of internship requirements. Students may be required to enroll in the PP8900 - Internship  Extension course if their working internship contract extends beyond the end of the Argosy Semester and intership requirements have not been met.

Internship Requirements*—Students Are Required to Take the Following


Internship Requirements—6 Credit Hours


*Students are required to complete at least 1500 hours with at least 600 hours in a school.

Gainful Employment Information


The following links provide program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, salary data, alumni success, and other important information for the Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) in School Psychology degree program  (32 Credit Hours) offered at Argosy University:

Campus Gainful Employment Information
Argosy University, Phoenix ge.argosy.edu/programoffering/3551
Argosy University, Sarasota ge.argosy.edu/programoffering/3617

 

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